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Listen: How to read a science paper

Our lives are on information overload right now. Genome Alberta’s own polling released this week showed that most Albertans are keeping up on COVID news daily, and some even hourly. That is a lot of news.
 
We also seem to care (at last!) about the science, and even the popular press are pointing us to scientific papers and scholarly journals where new science research is being published. And there is a lot of it. More than 7,000 new academic papers on COVID-19 have appeared since the start of the pandemic. You don’t have to be a science nerd to read many of those papers, and if you have a little extra time because of the lockdown, you might find it useful to go beyond the headlines and see what the research is really all about.
 
Tim Caulfield is the Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy at the University of Alberta, Faculty of Law and School of Public Health and Research Director of the Health Law Institute. He’s also someone who promotes science literacy, goes head-to-head with misinformation sources, and generally tries to bring good science out into the open.
 
I talked with him to get some tips on how the non-scientist can tackle a science paper.
(By the way, the way here is the Pew Research Center study Tim mention's in our conversation)

Listen: How to read a science paper

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