Genomics Blog

March 29, 2015 5:39 PM
Alberta Metabolomics recognized as Genomics Innovation Network Project
Filed Under: Mikenomics | 0 Comments
Genome Canada has announced a $15.5 million investment in Canada’s new Genomics Innovation Network. The Network is comprised of ten “Nodes,”  located in BC, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec to provide leading-edge technologies to researchers across Canada. (see Infographic) Each node receives core operational funding from Genome Canada, with matching funds from various public and private sector partners.

The Genomics Innovation Network is designed to allow innovation centres across Canada to collaborate and harness their collective power for the advancement of genomics research. Each Node provides Canadian and international researchers with access to the leading-edge technologies required for research in genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and related areas. These Nodes are also well positioned to push the boundaries in terms of developing new technologies in genomics and related sciences.

The Metabolomics Innovation Centre at the University of Alberta was funded as Canada’s national metabolomics core facility and technology development centre where it will continue to provide researchers with resources for metabolomics research. The Node is led by David Wishart and Christoph Borchers.
March 30, 2015 8:14 AM
Genome Canada unveils Canada’s new Genomics Innovation Network
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Media Release, March 31, 2015, Ottawa, ON – Genome Canada is pleased to announce a $15.5 million investment in Canada’s new Genomics Innovation Network. The Network is comprised of ten “Nodes,” each receiving core operational funding from Genome Canada, with matching funds from various public and private sector partners.
The Genomics Innovation Network is designed to allow innovation centres across Canada to collaborate and harness their collective power for the advancement of genomics research. Each Node provides Canadian and international researchers with access to the leading-edge technologies required for research in genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and related areas. These Nodes are also well positioned to push the boundaries in terms of developing new technologies in genomics and related sciences.
March 24, 2015 9:28 AM
Youth Science Outreach Programs Receive Government of Canada Funding, Southern Alberta Students to Benefit
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Media Release, March 18, 2015. More southern Alberta students will experience science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs thanks to a Government of Canada investment that supports the Actua network, including the Destination Exploration program at the University of Lethbridge.

The Government’s Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) announced today $3.6 million in PromoScience support to 66 recipients engaging over a million young Canadians. Further, the government will be increasing its support for science promotion activities to $10.9 million per year.

March 20, 2015 1:05 PM
More cautious use of antibiotic use in our pets called for by experts
Filed Under: Mikenomics | 0 Comments
Medical researchers and health care experts are warning against the overuse of antibiotics in people, in labs, and in livestock. Now the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine has come out and said their needs to be better surveillance of antibiotic use in pets.
We have a multimedia overview with audio, video , and a slide presentation for you to help explain the problem.
March 18, 2015 1:20 PM
Fecal Transplants - old treatment getting new attention in Alberta
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It seems that as we post more podcasts to our site lately, much of the subject matter circles back to a couple of topic areas that we knew were related but didn't originally intend to pull together - metabolomics and the increased use of antibiotics.
Dr. Dina Kao is a University of Alberta gastroenterologist and researcher who crosses over and circles around the 2 topics with her work on fecal transplants. As weird and as unorthodox as that may sound it is a practice which has origins going back to the 4th Century and one which veterinarians were still using to treat farm animals into the 1700's.
However the renewed interest has come about as people take more antibiotics and suffer from side effects that can kill off the beneficial gut bacteria. Rejuvenating that gut microbiome can be achieved through a fecal transplant. Other diseases that affect the liver and the bowel can also benefit from the treatment. Dr. Kao and her team are developing a urine test that reads the metabolomic signature to detect certain problems that could benefit from a supervised fecal transplant.
The treatment is still not a common approach but with funding from the U of A Hospital Foundation  and Alberta Health Services, it is getting more attention and research, and is showing a good success rate.
Freelance Broadcaster Don Hill talked to Dr. Kao about fecal transplants and clinical trials on patients with C. difficile.
March 14, 2015 8:28 AM
DNA Day: an opportunity for interviewing experts
Filed Under: Gerry Ward | 0 Comments
Even before the age of the internet, some teachers encouraged top students to follow their passion areas by contacting experts to learn more than the traditional curriculum. It was one of those ‘it seemed like a good idea at the time’ pedagogical strategies. When it involved writing letters, the student numbers involved were likely small; plus, students would have gained considerable knowledge in formulating questions and perhaps getting ready for a follow-up phone call or even a visit to a local university.

What has happened now that scientists’ contact information is readily available online?